Kerbey Lane (Part 2)

3 Act Math

Act 1


1. How many steps is it from Kerbey Lane to campus?
2. Write down a guess.


Act 2

3. What information would be useful to figure this out?
4. Write down some questions you have in your head right now.

The kids need to know how long each step is. This is a great opportunity to get the class out of their seats and measure a bunch of student strides. Find a nice average, and you’re good to go.

If that’s not feasible, here’s the average human step length according to Google.

Average Step Length
In order to find the distance between Kerbey Lane and the college campus, you could use a Google Maps Engine for the kids to explore. They can determine a best path and use the measurement tool to calculate the distance.

Here’s a quick tutorial to give an overview of what the Google Maps Engine is.


But, if technology doesn’t permit, here is a distance you can use.
Possible Route


Act 3


Better Act 3

This is a call to teachers in Austin, Texas. I think it would be awesome if someone did a little class field trip to test the results. After the kids do their calculations, actually have them walk from Kerbey Lane to campus.

If you’re not in Austin, I think it would be neat to have the students walk to a local building or maybe the school track. Just something to get them outside.


Sequel

5. How many pancakes would be needed to pancake the distance from Kerbey Lane to campus? (Andrew Stadel)
6. How much would all those pancakes cost? (Andrew Stadel)

Something to consider for the sequel:

Pancake Dimensions

 

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Common Core Standards
5.NBT.B
Perform operations with multi-digit whole numbers and with decimals to hundredths.
TEKS
5.3(G)
solve for quotients of decimals to the hundredths, up to four-digit dividends and two-digit whole number divisors, using strategies and algorithms, including the standard algorithm

Button

Credit: Kerbey Lane Cafe

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9 thoughts on “Kerbey Lane (Part 2)

  1. Hi Dane… thanks for this and all your other great lesson ideas.

    I watched the tutorial, but when I click on your link for the Google Maps Engine, I don’t see the tools that allow students to drag a pathway in order to find the distance. Am I missing something?

    1. Thanks for the kind words! I really appreciate it!

      Hmm yeah I can’t figure out why that’s happening. Are you signed in to a Google account? I noticed that the other day as well when I was on a computer I don’t normally use…

      I just tried the link while not logged in, and the tools did not show up. See if logging in works and let me know.

      1. I am logged in and it still isn’t working. I tried logging out and back in again and still no luck.

        Thanks for the tutorial… probably tons of cool ways to use Google Maps with students.

      2. Thanks for checking. I’ll have to look into it. I appreciate you bringing it to my attention. I’ll let you know if I find a solution. Maybe I need to change the share settings or something.

      3. Alright…John Stevens and Matt Vaudrey solved the issue. I just had to change the share settings to “can edit.”

        If you want the tools, you can now click the “edit” button on the map. See this link (http://bit.ly/1C5PufZ) for a screenshot.

        Let me know if that works!

  2. Thanks… it does work and it’s really cool! Thanks Matt and John too. I’m inspired to use this with my students now.

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